First Contact

Lynn’s “a” looks like mine. I hesitate for a second, pray, then open the envelop. Inside lies a folded card with artwork from the Met. Her handwritten message—written right-side to left—begins by thanking me for my “kindness.” Next, she comments on my “enlightened parents” and the importance of “good nurturing.”

Then she asks about my writing. Finally, she offers ways I may contact her. Email, although she checks from a public library computer once a week. A cell phone number—for a phone turned off during the day.

I lay the note aside. It’s aloof, almost business-like tone, with no mention of herself. Or how she felt about me. Not even a hint of explanation as to why she gave me up.

I wonder if I was better off leaving it in the envelop unread.

taken from her arms
cold comfort in cold words
on a museum card

 

Photo by Kelly Sikkema

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Frank J. Tassone

Frank J. Tassone lives in New York City's "back yard" with his wife and son. He fell in love with writing after he wrote his first short story at age 12 and his first poem in high school. He began writing haiku and haibun seriously in the 2000s. His haikai poetry has appeared in Failed Haiku, Cattails, Haibun Today, Contemporary Haibun Online, Contemporary Haibun, The Haiku Foundation and Haiku Society of America member anthologies. He is a contributing poet for the online literary journal Image Curve, and a performance poet with Rockland Poets. When he's not writing, Frank works as a special education high school teacher in the Bronx. When he's not working or writing, he enjoys time with his family, meditation, hiking, practicing tai chi and geeking out to Star Wars, Marvel Cinema and any other Sci-Fi/Fantasy film and TV worth seeing.

You may also like...